Lau Plan

English Language Learners
K-12 Lau (EL) Plan for Serving English Language Learners

Postville Community School District
Postville, IA
2017-2018

(Revised August, 2016)
Required Lau (EL) leadership team members: District Administrator-Tim Dugger, Building Administrator(s)- Ryan Zurbriggen & Brendan Knudtson, Jenny Schutte, Equity Coordinator- Brendan Knudtson, LIEP Teacher(s)- Mary Guese, Meca Loftsgard, Joy Minikwu, Corey Smock, Shelsea Baker, Susie Merrifield, RaeAnne Caldwell, Marcy Kraus, Aleya Stanbrough Content Teacher(s)- Jennifer Harman, RJ Olsen, Brad Rose, & Brian Orr
Suggested additional Lau (EL) leadership Team Members: Title III Subgrantee EL Consultant(s)- Sarah Brincks, Native Language Interpreter(s)-Adriana Vazquez & Mohamed Abdi, Counselor(s)-Denise Mauss & Manon Bushman
Lau Plan
The district plan designed to meet the instructional needs of English Learners (ELs) is referred to as the Lau Plan (Lau v. Nichols, 1974). The Lau Plan must be collaboratively written by the K-12 team identified above and must include the following required critical elements:

I. Lau Plan Guiding Principles (See Appendix A)
A. English Language Development: To help students to become English proficient in the language skills of speaking, reading, writing, and listening.

B. Academic Achievement: To help students to successfully participate in classroom learning situations and other school activities.

C. Cross-cultural goals: To help students become familiar and exposed to new cultures while maintaining pride in their own native cultures, in respect to each other’s multicultural backgrounds.

I. Identification and Placement of ELs in a Language Instruction Educational Program (LIEP)
Home Language Survey
1. All families are asked to complete a Home Language Survey, “Home Language Survey-IA” (HLS-IA student race and ethnicity reporting: www.TransAct.com) during registration. (See Appendix C for a sample –surveys in 22 other languages are available on the TransACT website)
· Our district is prepared to conduct oral or native language interviews in the student’s home with those adults who may not have sufficient English or literacy skills to complete a survey written in English. This survey will be given to all students and will be sure to complete student race and ethnicity reporting section.
Families registering children will be assisted in completing documents and registration materials on-site as needed. If home language assistance is necessary in order to secure accurate data, every reasonable attempt will be made to provide this support.

2. Home language surveys are given by office staff during the registration of new students. Translators are available to assist as needed. Home language surveys are then collected by the office, and then forwarded to LIEP teachers. If responses indicate that another language is spoken in the home, students are given the initial placement assessment by the certified LIEP teacher who is designated to the grade span the new student will be entering.

3. Completed home language surveys are signed by parents and kept in the student’s cumulative folders.

· Other data that may be used to initially identify a student as needing LIEP services include: student records, teacher interview, parent information, teacher observation, referral, student grades, or informal assessment.

B. State-approved English language proficiency placement assessment (TELPA Screener)
· Assessment of English Language Proficiency is given within the first thirty days of the student’s arrival (NCLB, Sec. 3302[a]) or, if the child enters after the beginning of the school year, within two weeks (NCLB, Sec. 3302.[d]).
· Building administrators will monthly monitor TELPA administration and ensure testing is completed within a timely manner.
· TELPA trained English as a Second Language Teachers or EL Instructional Coaches in the school district will administer the English language proficiency assessment.
· The certificates of trained test administrators, after completing yearly test administration training, will be filed in teacher personnel files.
· The assessment tool used is the Tennessee English Language Development Assessment (TELPA) is a placement test designed and based upon the full English Language Development Assessments (ELDA) battery of tests. It is designed to allow schools to place students, based on their acquisition of English language proficiency skills, into classrooms and services best suited for their current level of acquisition.
· Completed TELPA test results are kept in the students’ cumulative folders.

C. Process to place student in appropriate LIEP and content courses
1. The LIEP Teachers will collect and review data for new EL students within the first thirty days of registration, including the results from the English language proficiency assessment (TELPA), assessment of academic skills (MAP/FAST), prior academic performance, and initial teacher observations. The student’s classroom teacher may be involved in the collection and review of data. Each LIEP teacher will be responsible for his or her delegated grade levels (K-2, 2-3, 4-6, 7-12). The ESL Instructional Coaches will help organize this process and assist as needed.

2. After a team of certified LIEP teachers and classroom teachers analyze results of the TELPA assessment, and determine whether or not a student is non-English proficient or limited English proficient in any of the English language proficiency subtests (speaking, listening, reading, writing) or there is evidence that he/she will not be successful in the regular classroom because of language background, the student is identified for a specific LIEP program to meet the English language development needs of that individual student. Certified LIEP teachers will also take into consideration prior academic experience and circumstances of each student to determine best academic placement and resources supporting student learning and success.

3. After analyzing multiple academic assessments (MAP/FAST, prior academic performance and background, teacher observation, classroom formative/summative assessments), a team of LIEP teachers and classroom teachers will determine what academic needs and gaps students may have and determine which content courses would be appropriate for each student. This team will create a plan to best support each student in the academic setting. This may include, but is not limited to intervention times, pre-teaching and re-teaching opportunities, and appropriate accommodations and modifications on assignments, instruction and assessments.

· Students will be provided the opportunity to receive assistance with achieving academic success through the supports of Multi-Tiered System of Supports in smaller settings with certified teachers, through either an MTSS class or a Success Center setting.

4. Students will be placed in the general education setting in a grade that is age appropriate for that student (within two years of actual age)

D. Initial parent notification of eligibility following state guidelines, in a language most easily understood
· Forms for communicating this information to parents are available at
www.transact.com (NCLB, Sec. 3302) (see Appendix D)

If a child is identified for the LIEP Program :
1. Parents are notified by a certified LIEP teacher of English language development program placement no later than 30 calendar days after the beginning of the school year, and within two weeks of a child being placed in an LIEP program (if a child enrolls after the beginning of the year). (using Transact forms)
· “Determination of Student Eligibility, English Language Development Program Placement” (sent once upon placement). This form will be shared with parents, can be found on TransACT and includes parent signature.
· Notification of English Language Development Program Placement- Version A” will be shared with parents for initial and annual placement notification and program description from TransACT

o Administrators will ensure that the required parental notification letters are completed and sent home within the allotted time period.
o Notification letters are sent home and required forms are placed in students’ cumulative folders.

E. Parent documentation of initial waiver/withdrawal students from LIEP
Programing (included only if parents indicate they want to waive or withdraw from services)
1. If parents choose to waive enrollment of the LIEP, a meeting is held to discuss recommendations, concerns, and potential outcomes with parents.

2. The EL Waiver form, “Waiver-Refusal of ESL-Bilingual program” from TransACT, is used to document the parents’ decision (See Appendix D) Parental information is provided in “an understandable and uniform format, and to the extent practicable,” in a language that the parents can understand.

3. Waiver forms are signed by the parents and stored in students’ cumulative files.

4. Waived students are still required to take the ELPA21 assessment until they reach the required exit criteria. This will be communicated to the parents. Continued student progress is monitored through the full implementation of the Common Core Standards in each core subject area, Multi-Tiered System of Supports intervention times are utilized as needed, and EL accommodations are still provided to waived students on district wide assessments.

III. Description of the LIEP
A. LIEP Goals: (measurable and based on district-level data)
Language Goals: To help students to become English proficient in the language domains of speaking, reading, writing, and listening. Students need to show yearly growth on both Iowa Assessments (in math and reading) and the ELPA21 language assessment. A team of LIEP teachers, classroom teachers, and administration will analyze data from these assessments as well as other assessments to determine English Language Development progress.

Academic Achievement: To help students to successfully participate in classroom learning situations and other school activities. A team of LIEP and classroom teachers will analyze data from summative and formative classroom assessments (i.e., unit tests, daily practice, projects, etc.) and district-wide assessments (FAST, MAPS, Iowa Assessments) to determine academic achievement and growth.

Multi-cultural goals: To help students become familiar and exposed to new cultures while maintaining pride in their own native culture, in respect to each other’s multicultural backgrounds.

B. Description of specific state-approved LIEP model(s) used in district and the process to place students (See Appendix B)
LIEP Models and description:
Newcomer Program: Newcomer programs are separate, relatively self-contained educational interventions designed to meet the academic and transitional needs of newly arrived immigrants (typically students who have been in the U.S. for less than 2 years and/or have had very limited educational background); usually, students attend these programs before they enter more traditional programs (e.g., English Language Development programs or mainstream classrooms with supplemental LIEP instruction). The main goal of this model is to provide targeted and explicit literacy instruction, including, but not limited to, vocabulary, phonics, letter identification, socio-cultural norms, and survival language. An exit criterion is used to determine when students are at a proficient language level to enter into a different program model and will have more academic success in a content area classroom. The students in this program receive intensive English during two different blocks throughout the day, equaling 80 minutes of intensive daily instruction. These students are included in core classes the rest of their day.

Sheltered Instruction: This program is an instructional approach used to make academic instruction in English understandable to ELs, with a focus on newcomer students. In the sheltered classroom, teachers use physical activities, visual aids, and the environment to teach vocabulary for concept development in mathematics, science, social studies, language arts, and other subjects. Generally these classes are co-taught for added instructional support. These classes are most frequently utilized with newcomer students so these students are learning language and content at an appropriate language level. This program is offered in grades 7 through 12. Sheltered instruction is offered in the core content areas of: math, science, social studies, language arts, literacy and keyboarding. Each class is 46 minutes every day.

English as a Second Language (ESL) Pull-out Model: A program of techniques, methodology, and specialized curriculum designed to teach ELs English language skills, which include listening, speaking, reading, writing, study skills, content vocabulary, and cultural orientation. Further, LIEP instruction is usually in English with little use of native language. This program is utilized once students have enough English proficiency to leave the Newcomer Program and/or Sheltered Instruction.

2. Frequency and intensity of services by grade level/span/proficiency level and LIEP supports access to district core curriculum
K-1: small groups, 30 minutes/day
2nd: level 2’s: small groups 40 minutes/day
Level 3’s-4’s: 35 minutes/day
Level 5’s: 30 minutes/day
3rd: level 2’s: 45 minutes/day
Level 3’s-4’s: 35 minutes/day
Level 5’s: 30 minutes/day
4th grade: 30 minutes/day
5th-6th grade: 48 minutes/day
4th-6th grade students with lower language proficiency levels: additional 20-25 minutes/day
7th-12th grade: 46 minutes/day

LIEP teachers work in collaboration with content area teachers through PLC times to ensure students are receiving appropriate core content with accommodations/modifications as needed.

Non parental waiver ELs: Non parental waiver ELs receive direct LIEP instruction no matter what their level of language proficiency is. Low level language proficiency and high level language proficiency will receive consistent LIEP services.

C. Description of annual parental notification of continuing placement and programming options in language most easily understood.

Parents are notified of English language development program placement no later than 30 calendar days after the beginning of the school year, and within two weeks of a child being placed in an LIEP program (if a child enrolls after the beginning of the year) using the “Notification of English Language Development Program Placement (A).

The certified LIEP teachers complete required parent notification letters. Notification letters are sent home and copies are placed in students’ cumulative folders.

o K-1: Mary Guese: LIEP Teacher
o 2-3: Corey Smock: LIEP Teacher
o 4-6: Meca Loftsgard: LIEP Teacher
o 7-12: Susie Merrifield: LIEP Teacher
o 7-12: RaeAnn Caldwell: LIEP Teacher
Administrators will ensure that the required parental notification letters are completed and sent home within the allotted time period.

D. Procedure for annual communication with parents who have waived services:
This processed is reviewed annually with parent signature obtained each year.
Process for waiving students from LIEP:
If parents choose to waive enrollment of the LIEP, a meeting is held to discuss recommendations, concerns, and potential outcomes with parents.
The EL Waiver form, “Waiver-Refusal of ESL-Bilingual Program” is used to document the parents’ decision (See Appendix D) and placed in students’ cumulative files.
Waived students are still required to take the ELPA21 assessment. Continued student progress is monitored through the full implementation of the Common Core Standards in each core subject area, Multi-Tiered System of Supports intervention times are utilized as needed, and EL accommodations are still provided to waived students on district wide assessments.
*Parental information is provided in “an understandable and uniform format, and to the extent practicable,” in a language that the parents can understand. Parental documents are signed and stored in the student’s cumulative folders.

E. Highly qualified LIEP and content staff: (ELL endorsement/certification)
Certified EL teachers work together with administration to ensure that all staff providing direct LIEP instruction to ELs are educated by highly qualified teachers endorsed in ESL. ESL endorsement or pre-1988 certification (281—60.3(2)).
Administrators ensure teachers providing instruction in content area classes are endorsed in the content area in which instruction is being provided.

F. Designated administrator oversight for LIEPs
Administrator in charge of oversight for the LIEP: Elementary Principal and EL District Coordinator: Mr. Ryan Zurbriggen
Administrators supporting ELs receive training regarding ELs
This may include, but not limited to:
Training in ELP Modules
ELL focused webinar
Our Kids Conference
ICLC Conference
ESL Leadership Academy

G. Access to both Iowa Core Standards and English Language Proficiency (ELP) Standards
EL students will have access to both the Common Core and English Language Proficiency (ELP) standards throughout each day. Students will be included into classroom settings to receive appropriate Common Core instruction. EL students will also have specific language classes to ensure EL students have access to the ELP Standards as well. Non-EL teachers will receive training and certification in the ELP Standards and will include those in their daily lessons after training is received. EL teachers and ESL Instructional Coach will work collaboratively with content area teachers to ensure both sets of standards are being utilized appropriately.

Iowa Core Standards:
https://www.educateiowa.gov/pk-12/iowa-core/iowa-core-literacy-standards

ELP Standards:
http://www.elpa21.org/sites/default/files/Final%204_30%20ELPA21%20Standards_1.pdf

o K-6 EL teachers collaborate weekly with grade correlating content area teachers during given Professional Learning Community (PLC) times each Wednesday. 7-12 EL teacher collaborates with each content area group biweekly during this same given time. All LIEP teachers collaborate at least once a month.

H. Curriculum and Supplemental Resources
o Postville Community School District will purchase and modify instructional materials that are appropriate to the needs of the learner and goals of instructional programs (280—180.4). State funding is provided for the “excess costs of instruction of ELL students.”(281—60.4 and 60.6 (280)). Weighted funding (.22) is currently available for four years. For supplemental instructional resources, see Appendix C.

LIEP Curricular materials used, but not limited to are:

A. K-1 Curricular materials consists of:
1. Cengage Learning: National Geographic- Reach levels A and B
2. Jolly Phonics
3. Pioneer Valley Duckling Readers Levels A-D
B. 2-3 Curricular materials consist of:
1. Rigby’s On Our Way to English
2. Cengage Learning:National Geographic Reach

C. 4-6 Curricular materials consists of:
1. Cengage Learning:National Geographic Reach

D. 7-12 Curricular materials consists of:
1. Cengage Learning: National Geographic: Edge & Inside
2. Milestones
3. Spelling Workout

E. Newcomer Program:
1. Access: Building Literacy Through Learning
2. Cengage Learning: National Geographic- Fundamentals, Inside the U.S.A., In
the U.S.A., Reach A
3. Jolly Phonics
4. Rosetta Stone
5. Reading Horizons Systematic Phonics

2. Instructional and supplemental resources are selected, purchased and updated for LIEP curriculum and supplemental resources by a group of certified professionals made up of LIEP teachers, Curriculum Director and ESL Instructional Coaches. Together they collaborate, research, review and compare different curricula and resources to decide which curriculum most efficiently helps EL students reach the program goals. After selecting the curriculum, the team seeks approval from administration for the purchase of materials using a variety of funds (Title III, grants, etc.). At the end of each year, the team critiques the curriculum as a part of the program evaluation to decide on needed changes for the future.

3. The district considers ELs in every decision made in terms of curriculum. When updating core curriculum, one aspect of the review is what EL components are available for teachers to use. Curricula that include EL components, hands-on activities and specific interventions are targeted and focused on when looking at any new materials and resources. EL certified teachers are a part of the decision making team for any new curriculum or resources purchased for the district.

IV. Process to Provide Meaningful Access to all Co-curricular and Extracurricular Programs
1. Process in place for identifying and serving gifted/talented (GT) ELs:
o Giftedness is a human quality that is equally distributed among all cultures of the world. The strategy for identifying gifted ELs is much the same as the strategy for avoiding inappropriate referrals for learning disabilities: collect, examine, and weigh a variety of information about the student. EL students are given credit for any additional challenges they may face in the identification process (i.e. 2nd language acquisition, low socio-economic status, etc.)
ELPA21 data
Prior academic performance
Parent nomination
Teacher observation
Portfolio assessment
Teacher nominations
The Test of Nonverbal Intelligence (TONI) is used to identify gifted ELs for grades K-12.
Torrance Test of Creativity (nonverbal assessment) for grades 7-12

2. Serving ELs in GT programming:
EL students involved in the GT program in grades K-6 have push-in and pull-out opportunities. All activities will be differentiated according to language proficiency levels and abilities.
EL students in grades 7-12 receive gifted and talented opportunities inside their classrooms through extended activities (i.e. high order thinking questions, project options, etc.)

B. Identifying and serving ELs in special education:

1. When a teacher suspects that an ELL student has a learning disability, a pre-referral process will be used (See Appendix E). Also through the careful collection, examination, and weighing of a variety of sources of information by experts in the content areas, LIEP and in the area of special education, the difference will be distinguished between a learning disability and the normal process of acculturation and language acquisition.
ELPA21 assessments
Progress monitoring
Teacher observation
Prior academic performance
Peer comparison samples
Native language testing
Parental input
2. Students who are placed in both an LIEP program and a special education program will be ensured services through highly qualified LIEP and special education teachers with support for language needs.

3. The IEP team for these students will include the students’ highly qualified LIEP teacher, who will bring knowledge of the child’s language needs and training in second language acquisition.

C. Process in place for identifying and serving ELs in all co-curricular programs
Identifying and serving ELs in any other district programs:
Reading Recovery: data is analyzed from FAST assessments and other assessments, and students who are in the bottom percentage are chosen for services. Teachers collaborate with EL experts during designated PLC times for appropriate language accommodations and needs.
Title 1: Leveled Literacy Intervention (LLI)- FAST assessment and Iowa Assessment scores are used to determine student services. Teachers collaborate with EL experts during designated PLC times for appropriate language accommodations and needs.
At-Risk: students are identified as At-risk students through specific factors. The counselor works in collaboration with EL experts to discuss family situations and student factors. Some of these factors include, but are not limited to:
Poor attendance/absenteeism
Poor grades
Low achievement scores in reading or mathematics
Limited or no extracurricular participation
Other services (LIEP)
Teen pregnancy
Involved in alcohol/drug abuse
Family structure
Immigrant status
Career and technical programs: Teachers collaborate with EL experts during designated PLC times for appropriate language accommodations and needs. All students are provided the opportunity to investigate multiple career and technical programs through exploratory programs in middle school. As students enter high school they have the options of signing up for multiple career and technical programs, such as:
Art
FCS classes
Agriculture classes
Industrial Tech classes
Business classes
Technology classes
The district provides opportunities for outside counseling services through Alternative Treatment Association (ATA). The district also provides two certified counselors for student needs. Translators are available as needed to accommodate for language barrier needs.
Advanced Placement courses are offered to all students through the Northeast Iowa Community College. Teachers collaborate with EL experts during designated PLC times for appropriate language accommodations and needs.
All of these programs have paperwork/information translated to send home with students so it is available for families in a language that is most easily understood.

D. Process in place for identifying and serving ELs in extra-curricular (e.g., performing and visual arts, athletics, clubs, honor societies)
Extra curricular activities are available to all students and advertised throughout the school year. Information is made available for students and their families about these programs and eligibility in a language most easily understood. Translators are available to assist as needed. Some opportunities, but limited only to these are:
Band
Chorus
speech and drama
Athletics
honor societies
clubs

V. Ongoing, Embedded EL Professional Development for Staff who Support ELs:
Ongoing district-level EL professional development is available for all staff who support the LIEP.
Administrators participate in trainings alongside staff to build capacity and equip themselves to lead their buildings in serving EL students. A record of the professional development activities will be kept. The district LIEP Coordinator, Ryan Zurbriggen (K-6 Principal) is a part of the Leadership Academy to receive intensive training about ELLs for administrators.

LIEP staff (certified & support) will continuously work with AEA consultants to discuss professional development needs in the areas of language acquisition, literacy, resources, and research-based strategies. Personal professional development is a district initiative, which gives each teacher the opportunity for specifically focused professional development. Each teacher creates his/her individual plan each year. The LIEP staff work closely with the ESL Instructional coaches to continued professional development. Conference and workshop opportunities are also given to LIEP staff throughout the year.

Content and classroom teachers are provided with professional development in the area of EL students from LIEP staff along with AEA EL consultants. They will be provided opportunities for LIEP observation times, training about language acquisition, modifications, accommodations, language objectives, ELP standards and specific strategies. Teachers also have the opportunity to attend EL focused conferences. Classroom teachers are provided time each Wednesday afternoon to meet with LIEP staff to discuss research-based strategies and student concerns. They also have opportunities to work with the ESL Instructional coaches to continued professional development.
Paraprofessionals are provided professional development by classroom teachers as they assist in content-area classroom settings.
Building/district support staff will attend professional development opportunities provided within the district as well as other opportunities outside of the district (such as conferences, trainings, etc.)
AEA online resources, trainings, and conferences are available and encouraged for all staff involved in the educating of EL students. These trainings and conferences focus on literacy, core strategies, and accommodations.

2. PD for required staff for the English Language Proficiency (ELP) Standards:
In 2016-2017, all licensed staff providing service to ELs (i.e. content teachers and other certified support staff) will complete the training on their own, or in groups depending on staff preference. The completion certificates will be turned into the ESL Instructional Coaches to ensure modules are being completed. The certificates will then be placed in each teacher’s personnel folder. In 2017-18, in accordance with the new definitions in rule 281-60.2(280) in Chapter 60, all staff responsible for the LIEP service or supporting such services must be trained, along with support staff. Additional professional development in how to implement these standards will be given to staff. Implementation of these standards will be monitored through the inclusion of them in teacher lesson plans on Planbook.

VI. Annual English Language Proficiency Assessment (ELPA21) Administration
A. Annual training is provided for LIEP teachers in the administration of the English Language Proficiency Assessment through AEA PD Online.
Certificates are collected and kept in LIEP teachers’ personal files in the main office.
PD is provided pertaining to testing ethics and testing security to ensure test scores are valid for each student.
B. Dissemination of scores to stakeholders:
Scores from the spring ELPA21 testing window are shared with administrators directly as soon as possible after scores are received
Scores from the ELPA21 tests are shared with teachers through ILPs (Individualized Language Plans) for each student by class and/or grade level. These include the scores in all subtests (reading, writing, listening, speaking), along with the overall composite score.
Scores from the ELPA21 tests are shared with parents as soon as possible after scores are received through parent notification letters, which are given in the language that is most easily understood by each family.
C. Provide appropriate training to interpret results to staff:
The LIEP team analyzes ELPA21 data with the ESL Instructional coaches to determine deficit skill areas and strengths.This team will receive training in how to interpret these scores through a state-approved training model. Analyzed data is shared and explained to administrators and staff directly serving ELs during professional development opportunities led by LIEP teachers.
D. Utilization of assessment results to guide instruction and programing:
Core instruction: Classroom teachers will use this data to implement the necessary accommodations for individual ELs (provided by LIEP teachers- Individual Language Plans for each student). It will assist in determining appropriate interventions and student groupings within classrooms.
LIEP instruction: LIEP teachers use student scores to create student groupings, identify students in need of interventions, and decide what skills need to be reinforced. These scores will be utilized in determining the appropriate frequency and intensity of services offered. It will be used as one factor to determine the effectiveness and success of the EL program.
Future programming: This data will be one factor used to determine when a student exits and needs to be monitored and what types of future supports each student needs as he/she continues to progress in language acquisition and academic growth.

VII. LIEP Exit Criteria and Procedures
A. LIEP exit criteria:
Achieves the required score for proficiency on ELPA21
Scores proficient on district-wide and statewide assessments in reading and math
Meets both of the above criteria in the same school year
B. LIEP exit procedures:
Occurs during the allowable window (end of school year to Oct. 1 student count) after ELPA21 results are received
Notifies parents using the “English Language Development Program- Exit Letter”
Entered into SRI through the collaboration of the LIEP teachers (according to grade levels) and the building secretaries.
Begins two year monitoring

VIII. Monitoring Procedures after Students Exit the LIEP Program
Students are monitored for a minimum of two years after meeting LIEP program exit criterion. Parents will be notified in a language that is easiest for each family to understand.
Determination of ELs sustained academic progress includes:
Districtwide state assessment results (Iowa Assessments)
District assessment results (FAST/MAP)
Continued classroom success (teacher observation, grades: formative/summative)
The district’s LIEP Coordinator (Ryan Zurbriggen & Brendan Knudtson), with the support of the ESL Instructional Coaches (Joy Minikwu & Mary Guese) will ensure the fidelity of the monitoring process in collaboration with all LIEP teachers, Mary Guese (K), Marcy Krauss (1-2) Corey Smock (3-4), Meca Loftsgard (5-6), Shelsea Baker (Newcomer K-6), RaeAnne Caldwell (Newcomer 7-12), Aleya Stanbrough (7-8), and Susie Merrifield (9-12).
A team made up of LIEP teachers, administrators and content area teachers will assess each monitored student and their monitoring status i.e. continue monitoring, successful completion of monitoring, or consideration of re-entry due to language needs). This monitoring process will occur at the end of each semester to assess continued student growth and success.
B. Re-entry to LIEP-
If a monitored student is not showing success without the EL program supports, a team formed of members from the general education classroom, administration, EL teachers, and parents will meet and discuss student needs and possible re-entry into the LIEP.
Professional recommendation will be made to parents.Parents will be provided with their rights and options for their student to re-enter the LIEP program and the final decision will be left to them. Parents will receive notification using the “Notification of English Language Development Program Placement-A” form.

IX. LIEP Evaluation
A. Annual LIEP evaluation in place:
Evaluation of the program is completed by the EL department, facilitated by the ESL Instructional Coach, Joy Minikwu.
While evaluating the EL program, consideration for district data is used when planning for EL instruction in Core classes and in English language development. The team uses student data from the statewide assessments as well as district wide assessments to determine student achievement and success in areas of both academics and linguistics. An ELPA21 analysis process is used to create discussions about improvements and necessary changes in the program. Any significant changes as a result of program evaluation are discussed with administrators and then communicated to stakeholders through letters. Exit criteria are also used as indicators of program effectiveness. The district will use the state initiated “District Self-Study Guide” to analyze program effectiveness.
“District Self-Study Guide”:
https://www.educateiowa.gov/sites/files/ed/documents/District%20Self%20Study%20Guide.pdf
A second evaluation form is used to evaluate the impact on future programming and services for ELs. This document includes:
Professional development needs
Adjustment of the LIEP
Staffing
Teacher scheduling
Curricular needs
Meeting the needs of individual ELs and/or subgroups
Postville Program Evaluation Form:
https://docs.google.com/document/d/1O2kROw3lR-ONPqBG6En4glP6_3ksHVxzfsEPJvUz6uM/edit
4. Title III Assurances:
(See Appendix C)

Appendix A
Here is a link to download the full Department of Justice and Office of Civil Rights Joint Guidance document from:
http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/letters/colleague-el-201501.pdf

Appendix B
Description of LIEP Models
www.2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/EL/glossary.html

Newcomer Program: Newcomer programs are separate, relatively self-contained educational interventions designed to meet the academic and transitional needs of newly arrived immigrants; typically, students attend these programs before they enter more traditional programs (e.g., English Language Development programs or mainstream classrooms with supplemental LIEP instruction).

Sheltered Instruction: An instructional approach used to make academic instruction in English understandable to ELs. In the sheltered classroom, teachers use physical activities, visual aids, and the environment to teach vocabulary for concept development in mathematics, science, social studies, and other subjects.

English as a Second Language (ESL): A program of techniques, methodology, and special curriculum designed to teach ELs English language skills, which may include listening, speaking, reading, writing, study skills, content vocabulary, and cultural orientation. Further, ESL instruction is usually in English with little use of native language.

Dual Program: Also known as two-way, or developmental, the goal of these bilingual programs is for students to develop language proficiency in two languages by receiving instruction in English and another language in a classroom that is usually comprised of half native English speakers and half native speakers of the other language.

Other Bilingual Program: Bilingual education…refers to approaches in the classroom that use the native language of English language learners (ELs) for instruction. www.nabe.org/BilingualEducation

Appendix D

EL Parent Notifications and Forms
All forms can be found at transact.com
Home Language Survey- IA
includes second page for race and ethnicity

Determination of Student Eligibility, English Language Dev. Program Placement
Notification that student was screened based on Home Language Survey- IA and reports initial placement or student who don’t qualify

English Language Development Program- Exit Letter
For students who are eligible to exit services

Notification of English Language Development Program Placement- Version A
For initial and annual placement notification

Waiver-Refusal of ESL-Bilingual Program
Waive or withdraw from bilingual services


Appendix E
Special Education Pre-referral Process

Step 1: Concern brought to Administrator

Step 2: Administrator will help determine if Supplemental services are needed. Administrator can seek AEA staff for input for intervention and progress monitoring.

Step 3: Complete intervention form Student Placement Pathway indicating current level of performance (baseline), intervention being done, goal for intervention, method of progress monitoring, provider of intervention, duration of intervention, and decision making rule. Collect baseline data for goal. Determine a meeting date for review of data/progress monitoring.

Step 4: Inform parents of concern, intervention being started, and the possible outcomes. Team may consider involving parents in the intervention design process. (see parent contact sheet)

Step 5: Conduct intervention for pre-specified number of weeks usually (6-8wks.).

Step 6: Collect progress monitoring data bi-weekly or weekly depending on the intensity of the intervention. (Supplemental = weekly, Intensive = twice a week)

Step 7: Graph/document progress monitoring data. Consult with AEA for graphing support and data analysis.
Step 8: Monitor progress. If 4 data points fall below or above the aimline consider changes to the intervention. Seek AEA input if needed for possible changes.

Step 9: After 8 weeks (or team determined amount of time) a decision will be made for next steps: continue intervention as written, discontinue intervention, move to supplemental intervention, move to intensive intervention, or move to consent for evaluation for special education – AEA and parents involved in this decision making process
Research based best practice is to do an intervention for at least 6 weeks to determine if it is successful or not.

Step 10 (if applicable): 60 day evaluation timeline begins if a disability is suspected and move to consent for evaluation for special education (AEA as lead for this process)